Schedule

Day 1
7:30–8:45 a.m.
Lobby Atrium
Registration and Continental Breakfast
8:45–8:55 a.m.
Islands Ballroom
Opening Remarks
Associate Chancellor Linda Williams, UC Berkeley
8:55–9:05 a.m.
Islands Ballroom
Welcome
Chancellor Nicholas B. Dirks, UC Berkeley
9:05–9:15 a.m.
Islands Ballroom
Remarks
Congresswoman Jackie Speier of California’s 14th District
9:15–10:15 a.m.
Islands Ballroom
Keynote Presentation
Berkeley Interactive Theater
Risky Business

Managing situations of risk and suffering — especially those involving sexual assault and violence — is extremely difficult work. This interactive theater plenary will ask us to reflect upon our own relationship to the complex work of assault education and compliance in a direct and meaningful way. We will watch a dramatic scene, then have the opportunity to ask the characters questions. We will also speak one-on-one and as a group about our experiences as first responders.

Featuring Michael MansfieldMaria Lucero Padilla, and Louel Señores

10:15–10:30 a.m.
Islands Ballroom
Networking Activity
Vanessa George, University of San Francisco
10:30–10:45 a.m.
Break
10:45 a.m.–12 p.m.
Workshops
 
Enhancing Prevention
Session 1
Belvedere
Multiple Approaches to Bystander Intervention

Bystander-focused strategies for preventing gender violence have been widely adopted by colleges and universities. But a range of approaches exist for bystander work — not just one. Hear three of the most well-known practitioners of this popular prevention strategy share their perspectives on positive approaches to empowering youth to be more proactive and preventative in their responses to gender violence.

Featuring Vicki Banyard, Dorothy Edwards, and Jackson Katz. Moderated by Shannon Spriggs-Murdoch

Session 2
Mariposa
Helping the Healing Process

Sexual assault is traumatic, impacting many different aspects of a survivor’s life. Navigating complex social services or criminal justice proceedings can add to the trauma. Advocacy programs are a critical part of a community or campus’s response by enabling survivors to heal and move forward with their lives. Discuss how respectful and coordinated services can comprehensively address and support survivors’ needs and overall well-being.

Featuring Rose Carlyle, Malakai CotéMandy Mount, and Kristie Whitehorse. Moderated by Mari Knuth-Bouracee.

 
Changing the Culture
Session 1
Angel Island
Alcohol and Sexual Assault: Evidence and Next Steps

At least half of sexual assaults among college students involve alcohol consumption — either by the perpetrator, survivor, or both. Although research shows a link between alcohol and aggression, as well as alcohol’s impact on psychological, cognitive, and motor skills, there are gaps in our current knowledge. Examine a variety of findings from experimental and survey research, as well as suggestions for future research and prevention initiatives.

Featuring Antonia Abbey.

Session 2
Berkeley
Recognizing and Managing Compassion Fatigue

Service providers who constantly face heart-wrenching, challenging situations can sometimes develop compassion fatigue. The symptoms are often disruptive and depressive and can include isolation from others, emotional outbursts, physical ailments, or recurring nightmares. But healing is possible. Learn how to recognize the syndrome and develop authentic, sustainable tools for taking better care of yourself and affecting positive change.

Featuring Patricia Smith.

 
Moving Beyond Compliance
Session 1
California
Ensuring a Fair Process

With the spotlight on campus investigations of sexual misconduct nationwide, how do administrations ensure a process that encourages reporting, is fair and equitable, and offers appropriate confidentiality for all parties? How do you support complainants in stepping forward while not abdicating process for respondents? What legal and practical considerations are at stake? Learn about these important issues from the complainant, respondent, Title IX investigative, and student conduct perspectives.

Featuring Michael O’Connor, Adam Jussel, and Nancy Wahlig. Moderated by Denise Oldham.

Session 2
Yerba Buena
The Criminal Justice vs. the Campus Administrative Process: How the Two Coexist

How do colleges and universities conduct the administrative process? How do law enforcement agencies and prosecutors pursue crimes of sexual violence involving students? And how do these two avenues coexist? Learn about best practices and possible improvements that could give survivors and respondents greater confidence in both systems, educational institutions better tools to protect students, and law enforcement agencies and prosecutors the training and support they need to pursue justice.

Featuring Hallie Hunt, Mike Lane, and Will Mallari. Moderated by Margo Bennett.

12–12:15 p.m.
Break
12:15–12:55 p.m.
Islands Ballroom
Lunch
12:55–1 p.m.
Islands Ballroom
Video Welcome from Congresswoman Barbara Lee of California’s 13th District 
1–2 p.m.
Islands Ballroom
Keynote Speaker
Engaging Men to Prevent Gender Violence: A Social Justice Imperative

Gender violence historically has been considered a “women’s issue.” How can we reframe violence against women as a men’s issue that all men should be educated and involved in, especially those in positions of leadership? How can we inspire men to become women’s allies in prevention efforts — a fundamental question of social responsibility and justice? Hear how to engage diverse groups of men in this work at all levels in higher education, from undergraduates to university presidents.

1–5 p.m.
Amador
Healing with Art

If you would like to express some of the emotions that may come up during the conference, a professional art therapist will be available to guide you in creating art using her beautiful colors, paper, and techniques. Visit this safe environment to help you relieve and share strong feelings.

Featuring Gloria Simoneaux.

2–2:15 p.m.
Break
2:15–3:30 p.m.
Workshops
 
Enhancing Prevention
Session 1
Angel Island
Beyond Consent: How Reclaiming Sexuality Combats Sexual Violence

Media, religion, laws, and other entities can systematically alienate women from their own authentic sexuality. Beyond being unfair, this can leave women living in confusion, denial, and fear, easily manipulated by those who want to harm them or sell them endless streams of useless items. It can also alienate women from each other. Friedman will demonstrate how building a stronger relationship with authentic sexuality is a powerful act of resistance in reversing the effects of sexualization and sexual violence.

Featuring Jaclyn Friedman.

Session 2
Berkeley
Remaking the Hip-Hop Cypher With a New Mirror of Masculinity

In this workshop, we will challenge what mainstream hip-hop has taught us about masculinity with Krip-Hop Nation and United Roots, two activist hip-hop organizing projects. We will watch and listen to videos and songs that question hip-hop’s masculine ideal. Participants will write and perform pieces that create another representation of manhood in a cypher (a performance circle) and receive CDs from Krip-Hop and United Roots.

Featuring Leroy Moore and Galen Silvestri.

 
Changing the Culture
Session 1
Yerba Buena
Sexual Assault Prevention for Fraternities and Sororities

Accusations of sexual assault are damaging to the reputation of the fraternity and sorority community. This workshop will review components of effective prevention programs that consider the unique circumstances and challenges of fraternal organizations. We will discuss cutting-edge strategies, including the social norms approach and bystander intervention, along with implementation guidelines. We will also explore the role that chapter members can play in reducing risky behaviors among their brothers and sisters.

Featuring Alan Berkowitz and Taylor Fugere.

Session 2
Mariposa
The Sexual Wellness Advocacy Team: An Innovative Approach to Peer Education

Both peer education and interactive theatre can bring challenging issues to life and often play a valuable role in shaping campus culture. The Sexual Wellness Advocacy Team (SWAT) at the University of Oregon provides experiential, research-driven presentations on bystander intervention, supporting survivors, and healthy sexual relationships to athletes, fraternities and sororities, and other student groups. A crucial piece of the university’s overall prevention efforts, this SWAT presentation is an opportunity to be inspired by the potential of peer education and to discuss this model as a tool for social change.

Featuring Abigail Leeder and members of SWAT.

 
Moving Beyond Compliance
Session 1
Belvedere
Title IX, Meet Clery; Clery, Meet Title IX: Evolving Institutional Expectations

The amendments to the Clery Act made recently by the 2013 Violence Against Women Reauthorization have far-reaching implications for how institutions of higher education work to prevent and respond to sexual violence, stalking, and intimate partner violence. This session will address obligations and approaches for complying with the new Clery Act regulations and the overlap with Title IX requirements. It will also address details on how institutions should adopt proactive, campus-community approaches to preventing and responding to the covered offenses.

Featuring Steven J. Healy and Julie Baenziger. Moderated by Therese Leone.

Session 2
California
Can State Laws Enhance Prevention and Change the Culture?

Federal laws such as Title IX, the Violence Against Women Act, and the Jeanne Clery Act dominate the compliance framework at colleges and universities. Yet California recently approved SB 967 — the so-called “Yes means yes” law — that calls for “an affirmative, unambiguous, and conscious decision by each participant to engage in mutually agreed-upon sexual activity.” Additionally, several elected officials plan to advance legislation on investigative, response, and resolution procedures. Hear officials share their experiences and discuss current efforts under way in California.

Featuring Hannah-Beth Jackson.

3:30–3:45 p.m.
Break
3:45–5 p.m.
Workshops
 
Enhancing Prevention
Session 1
Yerba Buena
Men’s Role in Sexual Assault Prevention

Involving men in addressing and preventing sexual violence is crucial. Although most men do not commit assault or engage in coercive sexual activity, the majority often find themselves as witnesses or bystanders. Thus, engaging the “silent majority” of men in preventing the assault and abuse of other men is necessary. This will session provide an overview of strategies for working with men, and challenges and addresses the relation of men to women in this work.

Featuring Staci Gunner, Mauro Sifuentes, and Christopher Watson. Moderated by Alan Berkowitz.

Session 2
Berkeley
Self-Defense: Using Your Voice and Building Confidence

Discuss self-defense classes as part of a comprehensive strategy to address sexual violence. While class participants often leave with increased confidence in their knowledge and own physical capabilities, how do you address the tension between empowering people and victim-blaming messages that often come with sharing strategies to reduce the risk of assault? In addition to the physical techniques, what roles do gender socialization, oppression, the culture of silence, the power of voice, and setting boundaries have?

Featuring Christine (cici) Ambrosio.

 
Changing the Culture
Session 1
Angel Island
Involving Athletics in Gender Violence Prevention

Athletic departments play a critical role in campus life and need to be part of any meaningful, coordinated campus response to gender violence prevention. Recent high-profile scandals in college and professional sports have renewed attention to the importance of working effectively with key stakeholders. Hear a discussion of positive, creative approaches, including gaining early buy-in and participation from coaches and athletic administrators and training student-athletes to be empowered bystanders.

Featuring Jackson Katz, Brian O’Connor, Shannon Spriggs-Murdoch, and Mike Williams.

Session 2
Belvedere
Hooking Up and Sexual Assault

Sociologists Elizabeth Armstrong and Laura Hamilton observed life on a women’s floor of a residence hall at a large Midwestern university for one academic year. Their observations, coupled with interviews of women who lived on the floor over the course of five years, revealed much about party culture and its relationship to sexual assault. Armstrong will offer observations from her research and lead a discussion of effective strategies to challenge party culture and reduce student risk. Be prepared to share what you have learned from working on this issue at your campus.

Featuring Elizabeth Armstrong.

 
Moving Beyond Compliance
Session 1
Mariposa
Student Voices as a Catalyst for Change

As universities and colleges begin to create significant change around confronting sexual assault, student voices remain at the forefront of the discourse. However, many voices go unheard. The California Coalition Against Sexual Assault brought together a diverse mix of students to weigh in on creating change that they would benefit from. Review the summit report, in addition to students’ recommendations for making improvements in the areas of response, resources, policies, and prevention.

Featuring Denice Labertew.

Session 2
California
Coordinated Approach to Successful Prosecution

Prosecuting campus sexual assaults through the criminal justice system requires close coordination between law enforcement and the district attorney’s office. College campuses want to increase reports, arrests, and convictions in a collaborative way. Explore the development of a successful coordination strategy and approaches law enforcement can take to move cases through prosecution.

Featuring Paul HeniseyJoni Leventis,  Nancy O’Malley. Moderated by Margo Bennett.

5–6 p.m.
Bay Grille
Reception and Networking
Day 2: Wednesday, Feb. 25
8–9 a.m.
Lobby Atrium
Registration and Continental Breakfast
9–9:15 a.m.
Presentation on Heeding the Call

In 2014, University of California President Janet Napolitano established a task force to improve how UC’s 10 campuses address sexual assault.  Hear a student and administrator from the team share their perspectives on the first milestones underway, including implementing systemwide standards for investigation, adjudication, and collecting data, creating a comprehensive training and education plan, and increasing support for respondents.

Featuring Savannah Badalich and Sheryl Vacca.

9:15–10:15 a.m.
Island Ballroom
Keynote Speaker
Sexual Violence in Higher Education: At Last the Reckoning

Student activism, increased federal oversight, and growing media attention have placed the spotlight on how higher education is handling the problem of sexual violence. This convergence has created a genuine opportunity to confront the problem with honesty. Lisak will discuss the need for higher education’s response to be anchored in a data-driven understanding of the issue, as well as have the resources required to get the job done.

10:15–10:30 a.m.
Break
10:30–11:45 a.m.
Workshops
 
Enhancing Prevention
Session 1
Mariposa
Mentors in Violence Prevention Workshop

This session will provide a snapshot of the groundbreaking Mentors in Violence Prevention (MVP) approach to gender-based violence prevention. Participants will engage in a variety of interactive exercises and have the opportunity to consider the impact gender has on prevention work. The facilitator will also discuss the benefits and challenges of working in single-sex and mixed-gender settings.

Featuring Shannon Spriggs-Murdoch.

Session 2
Yerba Buena
Sexual Violence and LGBTQIA Populations

Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, intersex, and asexual people are subject to the same spectrum of sexual violence — in fact more, according to many statistics — as the general population. Approximately 10 percent of hate crimes against gay men and lesbians include sexual assault. However, the stigma that accompanies reporting is even more severe than in straight and cisgender communities and has left many survivors without culturally competent support. Join a discussion on how to move this issue forward and support LGBTQIA survivors in their recovery.

Featuring Elizabeth Coté, Billy Curtis, Mari Knuth-Bouracee, and Jezzie Zimbardo. Moderated by Cory Hernandez

 
Changing the Culture
Session 1
California
Challenging Rape Myths in Campus Pop Culture

Studies show that the acceptance of rape myths is a significant factor in the incidence and resolution of campus sexual assaults. Students, who arrive on campus with often little or no education about sexual assault, make choices based on rape myths, including the use of language, humor, and media that trivialize rape. This in turn heightens risks, inhibits survivors from reporting, and frequently contributes to flawed institutional responses. This workshop will focus on how rape myths are represented in culture (on and off campus), how to recognize them, and how to address and debunk them through concerted communications that extend beyond mandatory orientation classes.

Featuring Soraya Chemaly.

Session 2
Angel Island
Bringing Race, Class, and Sexuality into the Hookup Culture and Sexual Assault Debate

In order to more deeply understand student experiences and beliefs regarding sex, relationships, consent, and hooking up, this workshop’s presenters recently completed a study of students at a diverse urban public university during their first year in college. Learn about the researchers’ findings, which suggest the need to air some “dirty laundry” through critical reflection, deliberation, and policy and program reform. We will also discuss the need to more greatly consider gender, race, class, and sexual orientation in achieving a campus free of sexual coercion and assault.

Featuring Erica Misako Boas and Jason Laker.

 
Moving Beyond Compliance
Session 1
Berkeley
Leveraging Title IX to Advance Gender Equity and Social Justice

What’s missing from the dialogue on campus sexual violence? The acknowledgement of the role of power and oppression, as well as the impact of identities on reducing violence or responding to it after it has occurred.  This highly interactive workshop will challenge participants to reflect on themselves and the systems within which they work. When we let ourselves “off the hook,” we fail to frame this issue as a gender equity and social justice problem.

Featuring Luoluo Hong.

Session 2
Belvedere
Prevention, Response, and Resolution: What More Can Campuses Do?

The California state auditor released a report last June that found that California universities must do more to prevent, respond to, and resolve incidents of sexual violence. Hear how compliance with Title IX, the Clery Act, state law, and university policy is just one critical element of a successful strategy to combat this issue. Focus on substantive changes that California campuses are — or should be — implementing to support and protect students.

Featuring Elaine Howle.

11 a.m.–4 p.m.
Amador
Healing with Art

If you would like to express some of the emotions that may come up during the conference, a professional art therapist will be available to guide you in creating art using her beautiful colors, paper, and techniques. Visit this safe environment to help you relieve and share strong feelings.

Featuring Gloria Simoneaux.

11:45 a.m.–12 p.m.
Break
12–1 p.m.
Islands Ballroom
Lunch and Keynote Speaker
Dismantling Rape Culture

Rape culture is defined as societal practices that excuse or otherwise tolerate sexual violence. It can include jokes, TV, music, advertising, imagery, and language that make violence seem so normal that we believe it is inevitable. In this keynote, Maxwell will explore how to recognize rape culture and become an active and engaged opponent. Because rape culture impacts everyone, we all have a responsibility to identify and dismantle it.

1–1:15 p.m.
Break
1:15–2:30 p.m.
Workshops
 
Enhancing Prevention
Session 1
Berkeley
Importance of Training Disabled People in Self-Protection

People with disabilities experience three times more sexual violence than people without disabilities, but they are often dismissed or not believed. While the disability and domestic violence prevention communities have begun to address this, they have yet to create responsive, accessible services. Explore the importance of specific knowledge about disability, along with the recognition that disabled people can and should be trained in self-protection, just as other constituencies are. Discuss how outreach and services, by federal law, must be more inclusive of and accessible to people with all types of impairments.

Featuring Anna Darzins, Abbie Hunt, and Marsha Saxton.

Session 2
Yerba Buena
The Rising Voice of Student Activists

Sexual violence on college campuses is a silent, stigmatized epidemic, and no campus is exempt. Students around the country have launched a national conversation that aims to improve administrative response and educate various communities about prevention. Activists from different campuses will share their perspectives, including how this issue intersects with various identities, student rights and resources, and how students can organize to create change.

Featuring Savannah Badalich, Rachel Henry, Justin McClendon, and Meghan Warner.

 
Changing the Culture
Session 1
Angel Island
Sexual Violence Prevention in the News

The news plays a crucial role in shaping our understanding of sexual violence. If news coverage excludes prevention, it is harder to inform the public and policymakers and advance prevention strategies. This workshop will highlight key insights from an analysis of sexual violence in the news: who speaks — and doesn’t speak — in the coverage? What do they say about primary prevention? We’ll also discuss preliminary recommendations for advocates and health practitioners on how to improve news coverage and shift its focus toward prevention.

Featuring Pamela Mejia.

Session 2
Mariposa
Rape Culture on College Campuses: The Role of the Media and Pop Culture

From school dances to study parties, from Facebook posts to hanging out with friends, movies and songs play an important, large part in shaping the culture and climate on college campuses. This workshop will focus on dissecting popular songs, movies, and other media sources to understand how their messages contribute to rape culture; providing tools for people to have productive conversations around these messages; and creating a safe space to discuss the personal impact these messages can have on survivors and those who work with them.

Featuring Cory Hernandez.

 
Moving Beyond Compliance
Session 1
Belvedere
Trauma-Centered Approach to Responding to Sexual Violence Complaints

Cases involving sexual violence present unique challenges to systems designed to effectively respond to them. For example, survivors of sexual violence have suffered traumas that often significantly alter normal processes of memory formation and generate paradoxical behaviors that can be easily misinterpreted. This workshop will explore the crucial importance of understanding the neurobiology and psychology of victimization so that those involved in the complaint process can make accurate determinations.

Featuring David Lisak.

Session 2
California
Ensuring Equity for Respondents

Amid the heightened awareness of campus sexual assaults, a growing number of accused students are speaking up. Some claim they have been falsely accused, issued disproportionately unfair discipline and sanctions, or suffered reputation ruin or financial harm. Join a lively and thought-provoking discussion on how respondents can navigate the increasingly complex complaint resolution process, and how universities can ensure that all students have access to equitable resources and services.

Featuring Rishi AhujaCatherine Criswell, Gayle Sakowski, and Pamela Thomason.

2:30–2:45 p.m.
Ballroom Foyer
Break
2:45–2:50 p.m.
Islands Ballroom
Video Welcome from U.S. Senator Barbara Boxer of the State of the California
2:50–4 p.m.
Islands Ballroom
Keynote Presidents Panel

Sexual assault has no place on our campuses. Administrative leaders play a crucial role in addressing what is one of the most troubling and complicated issues facing colleges and universities today. Today’s executive panel of presidents and chancellors will discuss their respective roles, challenges, and commitment to dealing with this national problem through stronger prevention, response, reporting, education, and advocacy efforts.

4–4:15 p.m.
Islands Ballroom
Wrap-up and Raffle
7–8:45 p.m.
Wheeler Aud., UC Berkeley
Closing Keynote
Anita Hill: Truth to Power
Featuring Anita Hill and Janet Napolitano. Moderated by Nicholas B. Dirks.

In 1991, Anita Hill testified before a U.S. Senate committee that then-Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas had sexually harassed her while working for him — igniting a national conversation on a difficult topic typically met with avoidance and silence. Hill became an icon, empowering people around the world to stand up for equality and justice. Nearly 25 years later, the conversation has expanded to include campus sexual assault and violence. Join Hill, University of California President Janet Napolitano (and one of Hill’s former attorneys), and UC Berkeley Chancellor Nicholas B. Dirks to discuss how lessons learned from the past can be applied today. A book signing will follow. NOTE: This is the only event on the UC Berkeley campus and requires a separate ticket. Buses will leave from the hotel’s main entrance and run to and from campus between 5:30 and 9:15 p.m.